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  • The feedback is likely to be more substantive - less time is spent making grammatical corrections. It may also be higher level (Chiang, 2009, Milanowski, 2009).
  • There is some debate about whether audio feedback should be supplementary to written feedback.
  • Merry and Orsmond (2008) found that provided as long as the tutor indicated the points in the student's submitted text to which the feedback comments referred, it wasn't necessary to supplement audio feedback with written feedback. They compared audio and written feedback on 15 Human Biology students' essays, parts of dissertations and written reflections. Counting and categorising feedback comments yielded some statistically significant discrepancies which can be viewed in Figure 1 of their paper. Written feedback contained far more identification of errors but less correcting feedback which corrected errors and engaging engaged students in thinking than feedback via audio.
  • Emery and Atkinson (2009) report a number of case studies. In one, recorded discussions between two markers were made available to the individual students. In most of the case studies, tutors felt that audio allowed for far more detail and clarity of comment in expression, and students agreed. Merry and Orsmond (2008).
  • Carruthers and colleagues (2015) recommended making any marked annotated work available to students but stopped short of actually stipulating that it is necessary. What found that what cannot be replaced is a conversation with the marker to discuss the feedback.

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  • Depending on how the feedback is given and which devices students are used, expect some early a few minor difficulties. Do give the students prior notice so they know what kind of feedback to expect, and do actively invite them to let you know about any technical difficulties.

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Dr Chris Evans from UCLIC recommends: uses Moodle Assignment and makes the following recommendations.

  • An external mic is desirable though not essential (avoids picking up sounds from inside your computer).
  • Record each student's ID at the start.
  • Save the each file first.
  • Try recording without editing.
  • Leave in some errors - they humanise the asessorassessor.
  • Upload at UCL, using its from the UCL network since it is likely to have higher upload speeds than you probably have at homeelsewhere.
  • Moodle Assignment will let you multi-upload all the files at once rather than one-by-one - this may help with larger cohorts.

References

  • 1.
  • Carruthers C, McCarron B, Bolan P, Devine A, McMahon-Beattie U, Burns A. “I like the sound of that” – an evaluation of providing audio feedback via the virtual learning environment for summative assessment. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education. 2015 Apr 3;40(3):352–70.
  • Chiang, I. A., 2009. Which audio feedback is best?: Optimising audio feedback to maximise student and staff experience. A Word In Your Ear 2009. Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus. 18 December 2009.

  • Crisp, B., 2007. Is it worth the effort? How feedback influences students' subsequent submission of assessable work. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 32(5), 571-581.

  • Emery, R. & Atkinson, A. 'Group Assessment Feedback: The Good the Bad and the Ugly'. A Word In Your Ear 2009.  Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus. 18th December 2009. Available at: http://research.shu.ac.uk/lti/awordinyourear2009/docs/emery-atkinson-Solent_Audio_Feedback_paper.pdf .

  • Evans, C., 2017. Using Audio Feedback to Provide Quicker and More Meaningful Feedback. UCL Arena Exchange Seminar, 13th September 2017, UCL, London.
  • Evans, C., and Palacios, L., 2010. Using Audio to Enhance Learner Feedback. In: Proceedings of the Education and Management Technology (ICEMT), 2010 International Conference. 2-4 November 201, Cairo. Pp. 148–151. IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/5657683/.

  • King, D., S. McGugan, and N. Bunyan. 2008. “Does it makes a Difference? Replacing Text with Audio Feedback.” Practice and Evidence of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 3 (2): 145–163.
  • Lunt T, Curran J. “Are you listening please?” The advantages of electronic audio feedback compared to written feedback. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education. 2010 Dec;35(7):759–69. 

  • Merry, S. & Orsmond, P., 2008. Students' attitudes to and usage of academic feedback provided via audio files. Bioscience Education Journal, 11. Available at: https://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/EngageinFeedback/Students_attitudes_to_podcasts.pdf .

  • Milanowski, T., 2009. e-Feedback for formative assessment: can it improve student learning and assessment efficiency? A Word In Your Ear 2009.  Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus. 18th December 2009. Available at: http://research.shu.ac.uk/lti/awordinyourear2009/docs/Tony-Milanowski-E-feedback.pdf.

  • Nie, M. et al., 2010. The role of podcasting in effective curriculum renewal. ALT-J Research in Learning Technology, 18(2), 105 – 118.

  • Pachler, N., Daly, C., Mor, Y., and Mellar, H., 2010. Formative e-assessment: Practitioner cases. Computers & Education, 54, 715-721.

  • Rotherham, B., 2008. Using an MP3 recorder to give feedback on student assignments. Available at: http://sites.google.com/site/soundsgooduk/downloads.

  • Rust, C., 2001. A Briefing on Assessment of Large Groups. Available at:https://nursing-midwifery.tcd.ie/assets/director-staff-edu-dev/pdf/AssessingLargeGroups-ChrisRust.pdf

 



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